THE HISTORY OF CLIMATE LIES AT THE BOTTOM OF THE LAKE

Understanding how the climate changed in the past is both fascinating and a means to contextualise current climate changes. In this framework, lakes and the sediments accumulated in their beds are precious natural archives with biological and geochemical indicators, that help us understand current climate change and its causes. Specifically, Lake Ohrid, straddling between North Macedonia and Albania, which is considered one of Europe’s oldest lakes, and has proved ideal to study Mediterranean climate changes. An international consortium including several Italian universities and research centres has drilled as part of the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program reaching depths of 568 metres, corresponding to about 1.4 million years ago. The study of pollen and other environmental indicators combined with physical and mathematical models has highlighted the connections between the Mediterranean climate and low latitudes over an exceptionally long period of time. Results from the analysis of Lake Ohrid data will become part of the  greater picture of the climate on our planet and of the impact of human activity over the past centuries.

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author

Antonello Provenzale

Director of the CNR Institute of Geo-science and Geo-resources

Antonello Provenzale

Provenzale heads the Institute of Geosciences and Georesources of the National Research Centre (CNR). His research focuses on the interactions between climate, geo- and bio-spheres and the dynamics of ecosystems. Golden Badge Award of the European Geophysical Society, visiting  professor at the Ecole Normale Supe?rieure and at the Universite? Curie in Paris, at the University of Colorado and at the Ben Gurion University in Israel, he is coordinator of the H2020 "ECOPOTENTIAL" European project. He is also the coordinator of the GEO Global Ecosystem Initiative, as well as the author of 150 articles in scientific journals, books and articles popularising science.

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Laura Sadori

Department of Environmental Biology University La Sapienza Rome

Laura Sadori

A  Natural Science graduate, Sadori works at the Department of Environmental Biology of La Sapienza University of Rome. Her research focuses on palaeo-ecology  especially on palaeo-environmental and palaeo-climatic reconstructions in the Mediterranean, evaluation of human impact and the climate changes using the fossil pollen preserved in sediments. She is vice-president of IFPS (International Federation of Palynological Societies) and INQUA (International Union for Quaternary Research) and author of more than 150 scientific articles and book chapters.

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Giovanni Zanchetta

Chair of Geochemistry, University of Pisa

Giovanni Zanchetta

Born in Lucca in 1965, Zanchetta enrolled in Geology to become an archaeologist specialising in prehistory. He graduated from the University of Pisa in Quaternary Geology, and  worked at the University of Glasgow and at the Vesuvius Observatory in Naples. As a ‘archaeologist manqué, he is now a full professor of Geochemistry at the University of Pisa. He is in charge of projects on the study of climatic variations in the Mediterranean basin and in South America. He has authored 200 scientific works with more than 6000 citations.